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Rare Japanese Ko Imari Bowl BW w/Oranda Jin and Camel Early 19C
stock #240627

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Rare Japanese Ko Imari Bowl BW w/Oranda Jin and Camel Early 19C

The size of Bowl: 7” Dia x 1 1/4” High (177 mm x 32 mm)
This is fine and attractive Japanese Ko Imari Porcelain Sometsuke Bowl
from Early 19 century,
Bunka Bunsei Period, Bunka (1804-17). Bunsei (1818-1829).
The bowl is made of Sometsuke (Blue and White) with the design
of Oranda Jin (Holland Jin) with Rakuda (Camel). The design were
finely painted blue underglaze. The border design of bowl has
the leaf design are done in SHIRONUKI technique which leave
leaf design in white rather than in blue sometsuke usually painted.
It is reverse technique. The Orandaj in holding Camel.
Background with rock formation on left and Pine tree on right side.
The painting were handsomely balanced. The back side of bowl
Has diamond shape and Shippo geometric design around bottom.
The condition of bowl excellent, no chip no crack
and no hairline. The surface of bowl almost none scratch.
We guarantee the bowl from Bunka Bunsei period (1804-1829)
Please read the article from follwing Wikipedia so you know how rare
and hard to find our item.

Nanban Trade(Namban Trade)
Sanai pleased to introduce the item from Namban Trade which you can read whole historical events in Japan during Sakoku period(locked country, from 1603 to 1868) at Wikipedia. Namban (translated in English as Southern Barbarian) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanban_trade Nanban trade (南蛮貿易, Nanban bōeki, "Southern barbarian trade") or the Nanban trade period (南蛮貿易時代, Nanban bōeki jidai, "Southern barbarian trade period") was a period in the history of Japan from the arrival of Europeans in 1543 to the first Sakoku Seclusion Edicts of isolationism in 1614.[note 1] Nanban (南蛮 lit. 'Southern barbarian') is a Japanese word which had been used to designate people from Southern China, the Ryukyu Islands, the Indian Ocean, and Southeast Asia centuries prior to the arrival of the first Europeans. For instance, according to the Nihon Kiryaku (日本紀略), Dazaifu, the administrative center of Kyūshū, reported that the Nanban (southern barbarian) pirates, who were identified as Amami islanders by the Shōyūki (982–1032 for the extant portion), pillaged a wide area of Kyūshū in 997. In response, Dazaifu ordered Kikaijima (貴駕島) to arrest the Nanban.[1] The Nanban trade as a form of European contact began with Portuguese explorers, missionaries, and merchants in the Sengoku period and established long-distance overseas trade routes with Japan. The resulting technological and cultural exchange included the introduction of matchlock firearms, cannons, galleon-style shipbuilding, Christianity to Japan, among other cultural aspects. The Nanban trade declined in the early Edo period with the rise of the Tokugawa Shogunate which feared the influence of Christianity in Japan, particularly the Roman Catholicism of the Portuguese. The Tokugawa issued a series of Sakoku policies that increasingly isolated Japan from the outside world and limited European trade to Dutch traders on the island of Dejima. I have pasted only relating subject on our Dish. The Tokugawa issued a series of Sakoku policies that increasingly isolated Japan from the outside world and limited European trade to Dutch traders on the island of Dejima.

Sakoku (locked country)
Please see the subject at Wikipedia, Sakoku. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakoku#End_of_isolationism
Sakoku (鎖国 / 鎖國, "locked country") is the common name for the isolationist foreign policy of the Japanese Tokugawa shogunate under which, during the Edo period (from 1603 to 1868), relations and trade between Japan and other countries were severely limited, and nearly all foreign nationals were banned from entering Japan, while common Japanese people were kept from leaving the country. The policy was enacted by the shogunate government (bakufu) under Tokugawa Iemitsu through a number of edicts and policies from 1633 to 1639. The term sakoku originates from the manuscript work Sakoku-ron (鎖國論) written by Japanese astronomer and translator Shizuki Tadao in 1801. Shizuki invented the word while translating the works of the 17th-century German traveller Engelbert Kaempfer concerning Japan.[
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